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Department of Missing Persons
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Fact Sheet

 

•       Over 4,000 unidentified remains are discovered every year. Over 1,000 remain unidentified after one year.
There may be up to 40,000 human remains that are unidentified.

 

•       Nationwide, there are over 100,000 active missing persons cases at a given time.

 

•       The International Community Identification Network Database (INCIDENT) in partnership with  the
Arizona Missing Persons Database established a national long term record of missing and unidentified persons.
Utilizing forensic and coroner’s information on missing persons and unidentified remains,
the resource is designed to give families, law enforcement, medical examiners,
and the public the ability to become actively involved in unresolved cases.

 

•       INCIDENT was developed with the help of experts in all areas of missing and unidentified persons case management,
including victim’s advocacy and families.

 

•       Unidentified remains cases are entered by medical examiners and coroners offices.

 

•       Missing persons data in the AMD can be accessed by law enforcement professionals,
missing persons clearinghouses and the public.

 

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Victims’ Families Find Help with Missing and Unidentified Persons Database

 

Phoenix, AZ, (May 29, 2011) — Families with missing loved ones have had few places to turn in their search into answers, until now. Arizona Missing Persons Database established a national long term record of missing and unidentified persons. Utilizing forensic and coroner’s information on missing persons and unidentified remains, the resource is designed to give families, law enforcement, medical examiners, and the public the ability to become actively involved in unresolved cases.

 

“INCIDENT is the first step is finding what happened to my son,” said Daniel Adams, father of missing Mitch Adams. “It gives law enforcement, coroners, medical examiners a common source share information about our case.” The system allows local and national officials to cross-match records between the missing person's database and the unidentified decedent database starting in June 2010.


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This project was privately awarded by the through the Arizona Missing Persons Database.
The content, opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publication/program/site/exhibition are those of the author(s)
and are not in any way endorsed or affiliated with the Department of Justice or the National Institute of Justice.

Press Releases:

  • Mitch Adams - Phoenix Sun Report - May 2010